The Asianisation of Australia: volume 2, part 1, section 3



West Asia


Presumably following instructions from the Commonwealth Government, the Department of Immigration changed its definition of Asia, in order to disguise the large numbers of Asian migrants coming to Australia. This was because, as Stephen Castles (a pro-multiculturalism researcher) has noted, By this devious means, the whole of West Asia disappeared from the Immigration Department's definition of Asia (the Australian Bureau of Statistics continued for some years to maintain immigration records unaffected by such "fiddling of statistics", although they later adopted the same criteria).

As Geoffrey Blainey wrote in 1984 (before the Australian Bureau of Statistics decided to "toe the line" over the Immigration Department's definition of Asia):
Refer to the Table below for the Australian Bureau of Statistics' original definition of Asia.



TABLE 3

COMPOSITION OF COMPONENT REGIONS OF ASIA
USED IN ABS OVERSEAS ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES STATISTICS (1983)
(10)


(Source: Based on the composition of regions shown on p. 42-43 of the United Nations Demographic Year Book, 1983).


EAST AND SOUTH EAST ASIA                    SOUTH CENTRAL ASIA

EAST ASIA                                   Afghanistan
                                            Bangladesh
China                                       Bhutan
Taiwan Province                             India
Japan                                       Iran
Hong Kong                                   Maldives
Korea, Democratic People's                  Pakistan
Republic of                                 Sri Lanka
Korea, Republic of                          
Macau                                       WESTERN ASIA (MIDDLE EAST)
Mongolia                                    
                                            Bahrain
SOUTH EAST ASIA                             Cyprus
                                            Iraq
Brunei                                      Israel
Burma                                       Jordan
East Timor                                  Kuwait
Indonesia                                   Lebanon
Kamuchea                                    Oman
Laos                                        Qatar
Malaysia                                    Saudi Arabia
Philippines                                 Syria
Singapore                                   Turkey
Thailand                                    United Arab Emirates
Vietnam                                     Yemen, Arabic Republic
                                            Yemen, Democratic Republic

Note: This table is a reproduction of the table of the same name (although "1983" has been added for the purposes of this document) used in immigration documents of the Australian Bureau of Statistics, until it later changed it's definition of Asia to match the definition used by the Department of Immigration. Referral to any decent encyclopaedia will confirm the above definition of Asia.



As noted above, the Australian Bureau of Statistics later changed it's definition of Asia to match the definition espoused by the Department of Immigration. Adrienne Millbank, of the Australian government's Parliamentary Research Service, has reported that It is extremely obvious (especially after reading Stephen Castle's observation, as noted above) that this new hocus-pocus "ASCCSS" definition of Asia is a deliberate attempt to cover-up the extent of Asian immigration into Australia. By one stroke of the pen, government and immigration officials can refer to 39,524 Asian settler arrivals in 1995/96 (by excluding West Asia), rather than the actual 46,087 Asian settler arrivals (including West Asia).

Refer to the Tables below for a comparison of how excluding West Asia from the definition of Asia can radically change statistics regarding Asian immigration.




TABLE 4

COMPARISON OF IMMIGRATION STATISTICS:
ASIAN IMMIGRATION
(INCLUDING AND EXCLUDING WEST ASIA)
FINANCIAL YEAR 1995/96
(12)


                                Including     % of total        Excluding     % of total
                                West Asia    immigration        West Asia    immigration


Permanent (settlers)               46 087           46.5           39 524           39.9

Permanent
and long-term                     112 308           42.7          102 537           39.0





TABLE 5

COMPARISON OF IMMIGRATION STATISTICS:
NET ASIAN IMMIGRATION
(INCLUDING AND EXCLUDING WEST ASIA)
FINANCIAL YEAR 1995/96
(13)


                    Including         % of total           Excluding         % of total
                    West Asia    net immigration           West Asia    net immigration


Permanent              42 478               60.3              36 328               51.5

Permanent
and long-term          65 825               60.0              59 178               54.0




It is amazing to think that when the Australian government speaks of "Asia", it is - by deliberate design - excluding West Asia. What would Australians think if the government spoke of Australia, but by a new hocus-pocus "definition" deliberately excluded Western Australia? Or if a new hocus-pocus "definition" of Europe deliberately excluded Western Europe? Naturally, such a move would be seen as a ridiculous and farcical notion.

Another angle to the new ASCCSS country classification scheme is that it has divided Asia up into several separate sections, while leaving Europe still classified as one section. The main regions, according to ASCCSS, are now: (14)

Oceania
Europe and the Former USSR
Middle East and North Africa
Southeast Asia
Northeast Asia
Southern Asia
Northern America
South America, Central America and the Caribbean
Africa (excluding North Africa)

At first glance, many may wonder why Asia has been divided up into three regions (actually four, including West Asia; i.e. the Middle East), when Europe has been left as one region; as, following the same logic as used for Asia, Europe could easily have been divided into North, South, East, and West regions (indeed, these four areas have been used as sub-regions for Europe, along with a "United Kingdom and Ireland" sub-region). This strange classification of main regions doesn't seem to make sense, until one realises what can be achieved by it.

Consider the pronouncements made in the "Main Features" section of the Immigration Update magazine (produced by the Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs for release to the general public, researchers, and media): (15)

March Quarter 1996 (on page one): June Quarter 1996 (on page one): September Quarter 1996 (on page one): December Quarter 1996 (on page one): The September and December issues also include bar graphs on page one showing "Settler Arrivals by Region of Birth" whereby the Europe and the Former USSR section towers over all of the other regions; whereas - in truth - the Asian section (combining North, South, East, and West) should've been obviously towering over all the rest).



It is quite obvious that the ASCCSS classification scheme has been designed to enable the government to inform the media and public how immigration from Europe is the largest component of the immigration programme, thus deceiving the public.

The dividing of Asia into separate regions, and the exclusion of West Asia from "Asian immigration" statistics and "Asian born" statistics, are obvious and contemptible attempts to confuse the Australian public, and to hide from them the extent of the Asianisation of Australia.



The Asianisation of Australia:
Statistics (Immigration, Ethnicity, and Trade) (Volume 2)

Australian Nationalism Information Database - www.ausnatinfo.angelfire.com