Union Jacks and Southern Skies - appendix three



Appendix Three


The National Flag:
Extracts From Government Documents


1) Commonwealth of Australia Gazette. 29 April 1901.
2) Parliamentary Debates. Senate. Hansards. 9 October 1901.
3) Parliamentary Debates. House of Representatives. Hansards. 27 November 1901.
4) Parliamentary Debates. House of Representatives. Hansards. 30 July 1902.
5) Commonwealth of Australia Gazette. 20 February 1903.
6) Parliamentary Debates. Senate. Hansards. 12 August 1903.
7) Commonwealth of Australia Gazette. 15 August 1903.
8) Parliamentary Debates. Senate. Hansards. 19 August 1903.
9) Commonwealth of Australia Gazette. 22 May 1909.
10) The Flags Act 1953-1973.





DOCUMENT NO. 1:
COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA GAZETTE.
29 APRIL 1901.




Commonwealth of Australia.
Prime Minister's Office,
29th April, 1901.

DESIGN FOR A FEDERAL FLAG.

The Government of the Commonwealth of Australia invite competitive designs for a Federal Flag, such designs to be forwarded by post or otherwise not later than the 31st May, 1901.

The designs will be judged by a Board to be appointed by the Federal Government for the purpose, and a sum of 75 will be paid to the designer of that selected as the best.

Each competitor will be required to forward two coloured sketches--one for the merchant service, and one for naval or official use--not less than 6 inches by 3 inches in size.

All designs must be indorsed on the cover "Commonwealth Flag," and must be addressed to "The Secretary to the Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of Australia, Melbourne."

Each design must bear a motto or nom de plume, and must be accompanied by a sealed envelope bearing on its face the motto or nom de plume with which the designer signed, and enclosing the name and address of the designer.

The successful design will be submitted to the Imperial authorities.

The award of the Board, however, will be final, and the prize will be given in accordance with their decision, even if the design be not accepted by the Imperial authorities.

EDMUND BARTON.




DOCUMENT NO. 2:
PARLIAMENTARY DEBATES. SENATE. HANSARDS.
9 OCTOBER 1901.




COMMONWEALTH FLAG AND SEAL.

Senator PEARCE asked the Vice-President of the Executive Council, upon notice--

1. Whether it is the intention of the Government to officially recognise the flag and seal to which prizes were awarded at the recent competitions as the flag and seal of the Commonwealth?

2. Before such recognition, will the Government give the Senate an opportunity to give an opinion as to the suitability of such flag and seal?

Senator O'CONNOR.-- In answer to the honorable senator, I have to say--

The Imperial Government, through the Secretary of State for the Commonwealth, requested this Government to suggest designs for the flag and seal. With the view of suggesting such designs, the recent competitions were held. The prize designs, and possibly others, will be forwarded to the Imperial Government. The final decision does not rest with the Commonwealth.




DOCUMENT NO. 3:
PARLIAMENTARY DEBATES. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. HANSARDS.
27 NOVEMBER 1901.




COMMONWEALTH FLAG.

Mr. CHAPMAN (for Mr. Crouch) asked the Prime Minister, upon notice--

1. Whether the Government has arrived at any decision as to the adoption of a Commonwealth flag?

2. If the flag chosen at the recent competition is to be adopted?

3. If the Australian flag, when selected, will fly as the national flag on the ships of the auxiliary squadron, and on all Australian forts?

Mr. BARTON.-- The answers to the honorable member's question are as follow:--

1 and 2. The Government is submitting for the consideration of the Right Honorable the Secretary of State for the Colonies, a flag, the design of which was sent in by five individuals at the recent competition, and between whom the prize of 75 is divided upon the recommendation of the judges. Also another design which met with the approval of the Naval Assessor to the Board of Judges.

3. I am not yet in a position to give an answer to this question.




DOCUMENT NO. 4:
PARLIAMENTARY DEBATES. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. HANSARDS.
30 JULY 1902.




AUSTRALIAN FLAG.

Mr. CROUCH asked the Acting Prime Minister, upon notice--

1. What is the present position of the Government's movement to establish a distinct Australian flag?

2. Has the Australian flag, selected by competition last year, been submitted to the British Government, and with what result?

3. Are there any reasons why the Government should not make the selection itself, without reference to outside authority?

Mr. DEAKIN.-- The answers to the honorable and learned member's questions are as follow:--

1 and 2. The flag approved by judges in the competition of last year was sent to England in December. No communication with reference to it has since been received.

3. A flag is a symbol of a Sovereign State. The selection was made at the request of the Imperial authorities. An unauthorized flag would not be recognised.




DOCUMENT NO. 5:
COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA GAZETTE.
20 FEBRUARY 1903.




Commonwealth of Australia.

Department of External Affairs,
Melbourne, 11th February, 1903.

His Excellency the Governor-General directs that it be notified for general information that His Majesty the King has approved of the subjoined design (see next page) for the Flag of the Commonwealth of Australia.

The Governor-General further directs the publication of the following copy of a "Miscellaneous" Despatch which has been received from the Right Honorable the Secretary of State for the Colonies on the subject.

EDMUND BARTON,
Prime Minister.


-----------------


[COPY.]


Commonwealth of Australia.
Miscellaneous.

Downing-street,
29th December 1902.


MY LORD,

With reference to my telegram of the 6th of October, I have the honour to transmit to Your Lordship fifteen copies of the drawings of the Flags of the Commonwealth and the Flag of the Governor-General as they will appear in the Admiralty Flag Book.

2. The State Flags should in general be flown only by State Governors or State Government Vessels. In the case of Merchant Vessels, the Commonwealth Flag alone should be used, but, perhaps, as a measure of convenience, merchant vessels might be allowed to continue to fly their State flags until the passing of a Commonwealth Navigation Act.

I have the honour to be,
My Lord,
Your Lordship's most obedient humble Servant,
(For the Secretary of State),
(Sgd.) ONSLOW.

Governor-General, His Excellency Lord Tennyson, K.C.M.G., &c., &c., &c.




DOCUMENT NO. 6:
PARLIAMENTARY DEBATES. SENATE. HANSARDS.
12 AUGUST 1903.




COMMONWEALTH FLAG.

Senator Lt.-Col. NEILD asked the Vice-President of the Executive Council, upon notice--

Is it intended to submit for the approval of Parliament the Commonwealth flag selected by the board appointed to judge the designs submitted for consideration?

Senator O'CONNOR.-- No; it is not intended to take the course suggested.

Senator Lt.-Col. Neild.-- The course promised!

Senator O'CONNOR.-- I do not think so.




DOCUMENT NO. 7:
COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA GAZETTE.
15 AUGUST 1903.




Commonwealth of Australia.

Department of External Affairs,
Melbourne, 8th August, 1903.

His Excellency the Governor-General directs the publication of the subjoined "Miscellaneous" Despatch of the Secretary of State for the Colonies, and enclosure, representing the Flag adopted as the Merchant Flag of the Commonwealth of Australia, to be flown by vessels registered in the Commonwealth.

EDMUND BARTON,
Minister of State for External Affairs.

-----------------
(COPY.)


Commonwealth of Australia.
(Miscellaneous.)

Downing-street,
24th June, 1903.

MY LORD,

With reference to my despatch "Miscellaneous" of 29th December last, I have the honour to transmit to Your Lordship a Warrant issued by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty authorizing the Flag adopted as the Merchant Flag of the Commonwealth of Australia to be flown by vessels registered in the Commonwealth.

I have, &c.,
(Sgd.) J. Chamberlain.

Governor-General,
His Excellency Lord Tennyson, K.C.M.G., &c., &c., &c.

-----------------
(COPY.)


BY THE COMMISSIONERS FOR EXECUTING THE OFFICE OF LORD HIGH ADMIRAL OF THE UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND, &C.

Whereas His Majesty has been graciously pleased to approve of the adoption as the Merchant Flag of the Commonwealth of Australia of the Red Ensign of His Majesty's Fleet defaced as follows:--

In the centre of the lower canton next the staff, and pointing direct to the centre of the St. George's Cross in the Union Jack in the upper canton next the staff, a White Six-pointed Star, indicating the six Federated States of Australia, and in the fly five smaller White Stars, representing the Southern Cross;

And whereas by the seventy-third section of the Merchant Shipping Act 1894 it is provided that the Red Ensign usually worn by merchant ships, without any defacement or modification, shall be the proper National Colours for all ships and boats, and any other ship or boat for the time being allowed to wear any other National Colours in pursuance of a Warrant from His Majesty or from the Admiralty;

We do, by virtue of the power and authority vested in us, hereby warrant and authorize the Red Ensign of His Majesty's Fleet, defaced as stated above, to be used on board vessels registered in the Commonwealth of Australia.

Given under our hands and the seal of the Office of Admiralty this fourth day of June, 1903.

(Signed) J.A. FISHER.
J. DURNFORD.

By Command of their Lordships,
(Sd.) EVAN MACGREGOR.




DOCUMENT NO. 8:
PARLIAMENTARY DEBATES. SENATE. HANSARDS.
19 AUGUST 1903

.


COMMONWEALTH FLAG.

Senator HIGGS asked the Minister for Defence, upon notice--

1. Is it true, as stated in the press, that the Lords of the Admiralty have issued a warrant saying that "whereas His Majesty has been graciously pleased to approve of the adoption as the merchant flag of the Commonwealth of Australia of the red ensign of His Majesty's fleet, defaced by a six-pointed star on the lower canton next the staff, and by five smaller white stars in the fly, we do by virtue of the power and authority vested in us hereby warrant and authorize the red ensign of His Majesty's fleet, defaced as above stated, to be used on board vessels registered in the Commonwealth of Australia?"

2. Does not "deface" mean "to destroy or mar the face or external appearance of; to disfigure?"

3. Will the Government of the Commonwealth of Australia demand that the ships of the Australian Squadron shall use the Commonwealth of Australia flag?

Senator DRAKE.-- The answers to the honorable senator's questions are as follow:--

1. The Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty have issued a warrant to the effect stated. A copy of the warrant was published in the Gazette of the 15th inst.

2. "Deface" is believed to be a technical term used to describe the superimposition on the surface of the flag of any device.

3. The squadron is a squadron of the Navy of the Empire, and is expected to fly the flag which the rest of that Navy flies.

Senator HIGGS.-- Can the honorable Senator tell me in what dictionary I may find a definition of the term "defacing?"

Senator DRAKE.-- Probably in a heraldic dictionary, but I cannot speak positively.




DOCUMENT NO. 9:
COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA GAZETTE.
22 MAY 1909.



Department of External Affairs,
Melbourne, 6th May, 1909.

His Excellency the Governor-General directs the publication, for general information, of the subjoined despatch of the Secretary of State for the Colonies, and enclosure, respecting an alteration in the design of the Commonwealth Flag.

W.M. HUGHES.
Acting Minister of State for External Affairs.

-----------------

(Copy.)


Commonwealth of Australia.
MISCELLANEOUS.

Downing-street,
26th March, 1909.


MY LORD,

With reference to my despatch, "Miscellaneous," of the 27th of October last, I have the honour to transmit to your Excellency, for the use of your Government, amended drawings of the Ensign and Merchant Flag of the Commonwealth (see next page).

I have the honour to be,
My Lord,
Your Lordship's most obedient humble servant,
(Sgd.) CREWE.

Governor-General
His Excellency the Right Honorable
The Earl of Dudley, G.C.M.G., G.C.V.O., &c., &c., &c.




DOCUMENT NO. 10:
THE FLAGS ACT 1953-1973.



Section 8.
This Act does not affect the right or privilege of a person to fly the Union Jack.

FIRST SCHEDULE
THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL FLAG
1. The Australian National Flag is the British Blue Ensign, consisting of a blue flag with the Union Jack occupying the upper quarter next the staff, differenced by a large white star (representing the six States of Australia and the Territories) in the centre of the lower quarter next the staff and pointing direct to the centre of the St. George's Cross in the Union Jack and five white stars, representing the Southern Cross, in the fly, or half of the flag further from the staff. The descriptions and positions of the stars are in accordance with the following tables:

(Notes appended to the Act:)
"Date of commencement: 14 Apr 1954"
"This Act was reserved for Her Majesty's pleasure on 12 December 1953, the Queen's Assent was given on 14 February 1954 and was made known to each House of the Parliament on 15 February 1954. By a Proclamation dated 8 April 1954, the Queen's Assent was proclaimed in the Gazette on 14 April 1954 (see Gazette 1954, p. 1179)."




Union Jacks and Southern Skies

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